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Get Your Wide Angle On: 4 Tips for Using Your Wide Angle Lens More Effectively

Get Your Wide Angle On: 4 Tips for Using Your Wide Angle Lens More Effectively

Get Closer to Your Subject “If your photographs aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” Getting close to your subject, filling the frame with what you want your viewer to focus on, creates interest.  We’re naturally drawn to whatever is closest in the frame: the assumption being that if it’s close and large, it must […]

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Zero to 100MPH in Six Seconds…Shooting the Lambo Gallardo Superleggera

Zoom zoom! My good friend, Booker, will be photographing the upcoming prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance for Garage Style Magazine. In preparation, we thought we’d get in a little practice shooting moving vehicles-car to car, as it were.  So, rather than shooting our Honda Pilot or my PT Cruiser, Booker arranged for his neighbor, Gary, to […]

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Overpowering Sunlight – the Quad Bracket

In my never-ending search for more power, I came across an idea for a bracket to support 4 (count ’em, 4!) hotshoe flashes at a time! I wish I could take credit for the idea, but I was inspired by this post. I modified the design somewhat to enable easy attachment to my extensible pole or […]

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New PocketWizard-Friendly Multi-Flash Bracket

Hi Friends, When working with flash in bright sun, it’s often necessary to gang several flash units together to compensate for the loss of output when operating at sync speeds above normal flash sync (i.e., “high speed sync”). A month or two back, I crafted a simple straight bar (my “Stro-bar”) with three cold shoes […]

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Strobe One…Sun Zip! Portraits in full sunlight with the DIY “Stro-Bar”

Hi Friends, Had the day off today, and took advantage of it to build something I’d been meaning to do for a long time: a multi-flash lightbar (which I’ve taken to calling my “Stro-Bar”-clever, huh?). The purpose is to be able to mount multiple hotshoe flashes (in my case, Nikon SB-800s) to combine output for situations […]

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“Flash-on-a-Stick” – Putting the Light Where You Want It.

Hi Friends, I’ve been asked by a number of folks for details on my “flash-on-a-stick” arrangement that I frequently use for portrait lighting with hotshoe strobes.  I know other folks use a similar arrangement, but I thought I’d show the details of mine, and you can adjust accordingly. The goal of the rig is to put […]

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Beefing up the Justin Clamp

I’m a huge fan of the Manfrotto Justin Clamp (175F Spring Clamp with Flash Shoe).  I have a couple, and use them all the time. They’re extremely versatile, and an indispensable piece of my photography kit. That said, my only complaint with the design has been the push fit connection of the plastic flash shoe (at […]

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“What were your exposure settings…?”

As a photography educator, I get this question a lot. If you read much on photography, particularly introductory materials, you’ll often find that the author sort of rolls his eyes and pooh-poos the question.  After all, without knowing how the photographer is framing the shot, what exposure he’s after, and a dozen other variables, just […]

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A few more portraits from the OR…

[clearspring_widget title=”Animoto.com” wid=”4805fc0db4a3562c” pid=”4b74ba7b60488cea” width=”432″ height=”240″ domain=”widgets.clearspring.com”] Wrapped up our shoot for “Infection Control in the Operating Room.” (working subtitle: “the 5-second rule.”).  Did a couple final portraits of cast and consultants while I still had access to the OR. Here’s the general setup / lighting details for the OR portraits… Shot with D2x; 24-70 […]

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Product Photography on a Budget: Part 2

In my last post, I showed you a quick and inexpensive solution for tabletop product photography that used just a couple table lamps and a piece of posterboard. Stepping up from that option just a bit, we can add a little diffusion to our light source for smoother wrap-around lighting and softer shadows. Quick and […]

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